Insulin in human is used to control blood sugar in people who have Diabetes especially type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Human insulin is in a class of medications called hormones

The Purpose of mixing insulin is to prevent having to give the patient two separate injections (hence better for the patient) and the most commonly ordered insulin that are mixed: NPH (intermediate-acting) and Regular insulin (short-acting).

Your doctor or diabetes educator may ask you to mix a shorts acting or clear insulin with an intermediate or long acting cloudy insulin in the same syringe so that both can be given at the same time.

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Important Points to Keep in Mind

  • Never mix Insulin Glargine “Lantus” with any other type of insulin.
  • Administer the dose within 5 to 10 minutes after drawing up because the regular insulin binds to the NPH and this decreases its action.
  • Check the patient’s blood sugar and for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia to ensure they aren’t hypoglycemic…if patient is hypoglycemic hold the dose and notify the Doctor for guide.

Steps on How to Mix Insulin

  •  Check the doctor’s order and that you have the correct medication:
  • Let’s say the doctor has asked you to mix 10 units of regular, clear, insulin with 15 units of NPH cloudy insulin, to a total combined dose of 25 units.
  • Always draw “clear before cloudy” insulin into the syringe. This is to prevent cloudy insulin from entering the clear insulin bottle.
  • Roll the bottle of the cloudy insulin between your hands to mix it.
  • Clean both bottle tops with an alcohol wipe.
  • Pull back the plunger of the syringe to the dose of the long-acting (cloudy) insulin in this example 15 units. You now have 15 units of air in the syringe.
  • Check the insulin bottle to ensure you have the correct cloudy type of insulin.
  • With the insulin bottle held firmly on a counter or tabletop, insert the needle through the rubber cap into the bottle.
  • Push the plunger down so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle.
  • Remove the needle and syringe. This primes the bottle for when you withdraw the insulin later.
  • Pull back the plunger of the syringe to the dose of the shorter acting clear insulin in this example 10 units. You now have 10 units of air in the syringe.
  • Check the insulin bottle to ensure you have the correct clear type of insulin.
  • With the insulin bottle held firmly on a counter or tabletop, insert the needle through the rubber cap into the bottle.
  • Push the plunger down so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle.
  • Turn the bottle upside down so that the air in it goes to the top.
  • With the tip of the needle kept in the liquid, withdraw the dose of clear insulin, in this example, 10 units.
  • Remove the needle and syringe.
  • Go back to the longer-acting, cloudy insulin bottle.
  • Turn it upside down.
  • Insert the needle into the liquid and slowly pull back the plunger to measure your total dose, in this example, 25 units.

You are now ready to give your injection.

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